GT Zirkon

Family overview
  • Ultra Light Italic
  • Thin Italic
  • Light Italic
  • Book Italic
  • Regular Italic
  • Medium Italic
  • Bold Italic
  • Black Italic
  • Ultra Light
    Zircon often contains traces of radioactive elements in its structure, which causes it to be metamict.
  • Ultra Light Italic
    On the Isle of Skye near Ireland, is a chapel dedicated to St. Columbus, and on the altar is a round crystalline blue stone held sacred to weather and health.
  • Thin
    Zircons from Jack Hills in the Narryer Gneiss Terrane, Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia, have yielded U-Pb ages up to 4.404 billion years
  • Thin Italic
    The English word “zircon” is derived from “Zirkon”, which is the German adaptation of this word.
  • Light
    Researchers found that same carbon 12 isotope in the diamond specks, indicating that they may have been formed from ancient microbes that were buried deep underground and subjected to enormous pressure.
  • Light Italic
    Zirconium is a mineral belonging to the group of nesosilicates.
  • Book
    Australia leads the world in zircon mining, producing 37% of the world total and accounting for 40% of world EDR for the mineral.
  • Book Italic
    In crystal growth, combinations of light intensity, light color, electric current, sound, the direction of these, plus the shape and size (frequency pattern) of the container or room, will all affect the final characteristics and energy potentials of a desired stone.
  • Regular
    Zircon is an important gemstone, with several color forms used in various forms of jewelry.
  • Regular Italic
    An interesting habit occasionally exhibited in Zircon from a few localities is that their color darkens and their luster dulls upon prolonged exposure to sunlight.
  • Medium
    Zircon is ubiquitous in the crust of Earth and it occurs as a common accessory mineral in igneous rocks, in metamorphic rocks and as detrital grains in sedimentary rocks.
  • Medium Italic
    Crystals are almost always terminated with a pyramidal termination, and may be doubly terminated, and occasionally entirely pyramidal resembling an octahedron.
  • Bold
    Zirconium is a mineral belonging to the group of nesosilicates.
  • Bold Italic
    Chemical substitution and coordination polyhedra explain this common feature of minerals.
  • Black
    Yellow, orange and red zircon is also known as “hyacinth”, from the flower hyacinthus, whose name is of Ancient Greek origin.
  • Black Italic
    The English word “zircon” is derived from “Zirkon”, which is the German adaptation of this word.
  • Settings
    Size
Typeface information

GT Zirkon is an extravagant sans serif workhorse. It blends the worlds of rational tool and ornamentation by applying techniques used to optimize type for small sizes in a refined way.

Latin-alphabet languages: Afaan, Afar, Afrikaans, Albanian, Alsatian, Amis, Anuta, Aragonese, Aranese, Aromanian, Arrernte, Asturian, Atayal, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Basque, Belarusian, Bemba, Bikol, Bislama, Bosnian, Breton, Cape Verdean Creole, Catalan, Cebuano, Chamorro, Chavacano, Chichewa, Chickasaw, Cimbrian, Cofán, Cornish, Corsican, Creek, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dawan, Dholuo, Drehu, Dutch, English, Estonian, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino, Finnish, French, Frisian, Friulian, Galician, Ganda, Genoese, German, Gikuyu, Gooniyandi, Greenlandic (Kalaallisut), Guadeloupean Creole, Gwich’in, Haitian Creole, Hawaiian, Hiligaynon, Hopi, Hungarian, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ilocano, Indonesian , Irish, Istro-Romanian, Italian, Jamaican, Javanese, Jèrriais, Kaingang, Kala Lagaw Ya, Kapampangan, Kaqchikel, Kashubian, Kikongo, Kinyarwanda, Kiribati, Kirundi, Kurdish, Ladin, Latin, Latvian, Lithuanian, Lombard, Low Saxon, Luxembourgish, Maasai, Makhuwa, Malay, Maltese, Manx, Māori, Marquesan, Megleno-Romanian, Meriam Mir, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moldovan, Montagnais, Montenegrin, Murrinh-Patha, Nagamese Creole, Nahuatl, Ndebele, Neapolitan, Niuean, Noongar, Norwegian, Occitan, Old Icelandic, Old Norse, Oshiwambo, Palauan, Papiamento, Piedmontese, Polish, Portuguese, Q’eqchi’, Quechua, Rarotongan, Romanian, Romansh, Rotokas, Inari Sami, Lule Sami, Northern Sami, Southern Sami, Samoan, Sango, Saramaccan, Sardinian, Scottish Gaelic, Seri, Seychellois Creole, Shawnee, Shona, Sicilian, Silesian, Slovak, Slovenian, Somali, Upper and Lower Sorbian, Northern and Southern Sotho, Spanish, Sranan, Sundanese, Swahili, Swazi, Swedish, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tetum, Tok Pisin, Tokelauan, Tongan, Tshiluba, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Turkish, Tuvaluan, Tzotzil, Venetian, Vepsian, Võro, Wallisian, Walloon, Waray-Waray, Warlpiri, Wayuu, Welsh, Wik-Mungkan, Wolof, Xavante, Xhosa, Yapese, Yindjibarndi, Zapotec, Zarma, Zazaki, Zulu, Zuni

Typeface features

OpenType features enable smart typography. You can use these features in most Desktop applications, on the web, and in your mobile apps. Each typeface contains different features. Below are the most important features included in GT Zirkon’s fonts:

  • SS01
  • Alternate Arrows
Volume ↗
  • SS02
  • Alternate f
Refraction
  • ONUM
  • Oldstyle Figures
0123456789
  • SMCP
  • Small Caps
Ore Deposit
Typeface Minisite
  • Visit the GT Zirkon minisite to discover more about the typeface family’s history and design concept.
GT Zirkon in use